Archives for category: innovation

Ace 5

 

TL:DR Large corporates really struggle to innovate. Meanwhile startups eat their lunch.

Corporate venturing and accelerators can solve the issue and create a win-win.

If you are a corporate CEO you are probably frustrated by the inability of your company to innovate like a startup. You almost certainly employ some of the brightest people around and may have huge departments looking at innovation or R&D. However, your industry is almost certainly being disrupted by tiny teams of startup founders with new business models and a grasp for frontier technologies such as artificial intelligence and virtual reality.

Corporate executives shouldn’t beat themselves up too much. The odds are weighted against them. It is almost impossible to innovate within the existing corporate structure. Most truly innovative ideas will cannibalise existing business models, change the structure of the company and redeploy the workforce at the very least. It is therefore, extremely difficult for internal departments to gain acceptance from the rest of the company. In addition, risk is a fundimental component of all radical change. Who wants to fail fast in a corporate environment? Yet it is enshrined in startup culture.

The most effective way for corporates to access startup innovation is to buy into it. This can involve either buying early stage startups outright, investing in them or running accelerator programmes. In all cases, there can be huge advantages from having third party involvement. The key is to take a relatively hands-off approach to stop corporate interference which invariably kills the innovation that you are searching for.

Accelerator programmes illustrate this well. A corporate working with a third party can immediately invest relatively small amounts of capital into a small portfolio of interesting early stage businesses. They can provide an environment conducive to growth by giving access to essential corporate assets such as sales channels, engineering resources and other mentors.

At a later stage corporates can invest in more mature startups with a corporate venturing approach. This involves scouting for winners and making individual investments. The challenge is picking the winners and a company like Dreamstake Ventures can help cut through the noise and reduce risk.

Corporate investment in startups, through programmes or individually creates a win-win. The corporate accesses innovation quickly and efficiently, whilst the startup gains resources and support for growth. Corporates need to embrace the startup culture and take their businesses to new heights.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform focusing entirely on taking startups from inception to Series A. Dreamstake identifies promising startups from universities and other accelerators and provides them with access to the resources they need to achieve later stage success. This is achieved through a large programme run out of Google Campus in London and our own network of experts and investors. We run corporate accelerators on behalf of clients and have recently supported Just Eat with a Foodtech accelerator.

FailsWe all make mistakes, especially when trying to do something for the first time. In fact, I think I have probably made all of these startup fails at some time or other.

The startup world is constantly evolving. However, most of these fails are not new. I would really like other entrepreneurs to learn from my mistakes. Avoiding these simple fails will increase your chance of building a successful startup and reduce the time it takes you to get there.

Don’t build before you are certain there is a burning need

Probably the most common mistake for founders to make is to build an MVP before establishing a need. You may have read articles that suggest that it is important to get an MVP out as quickly as possible. Right, but not before you can verify that there is a burning need for what you are about to build. It is easy to test demand for your product using pen and paper and open questioning. Check that you are solving a real problem and that there are no valid alternatives that the user might use. Obsess at this stage and do not move forward until you are absolutely certain that your solution will address the issue in question. If you do build an MVP without validation of the problem you will find engagement to be slow or non-existant and total reluctance from investors to get involved.

Don’t do it alone

Building a tech startup is a team activity. A single founder will never have the full set of capabilities or bandwidth to launch a startup on their own. At early stage there is very little else, apart from the team, for investors to judge the startup on. As well as the core team, surround yourself with experts. Persuading an advisory board to support you is good way to get validation for what you are doing. If they won’t come in, they probably don’t have confidence that you will make it. Listen to what they say and tweak your proposition if it makes sense.

Don’t be closed-minded

Although founders are expected to be strong, driven individuals, close-mindedness is a red flag to investors (and probably to clients and employees). It is important to listen to advice and decide what to act upon. Select advisors with relevant knowledge; either existing successful founders or individuals with deep sector experience. Don’t look for yes-men. It is much more valuable to find people who will give blunt feedback. Learn how to take tough love.

Don’t misjudge timing

It’s easy to be either to early or too late with an idea. A lot of what you read is hot is from a Venture Capital perspective. However, by the time you have got your startup off the ground the VCs will be exploring the next big thing. If what you are working on seems too familiar then you are probably too late. Many consumer apps are in this category. If you are coming in late, make sure that you can improve on whats already out there and be totally sure that users will switch from what they have become familiar with. It is also possible to be too early. Think Google Glass or the first iterations of tablets. Remember there is a difference between pure research and being a first mover in a commercial marketplace.

Don’t under-estimate how long it takes to raise capital

Raising capital is much more difficult than first-time founders ever imagine. It is also important to remember that it is not just the first round of funding to take into consideration. There is nothing worse than raising a simple seed round only to find that you can’t get VCs (or anyone else) interested, once you have burned through the cash. Work backwards from the VC round and estimate how much you need to raise at the seed stage to get there. Venture Capital firms are moving upwards and this has created a nasty gap, sometimes calling for a bridge round. In building the first seed round, find a lead investor and build around this individual. They will bring confidence and attract other investors. Allow 6 months for each round and make sure that you are investment ready before starting the process.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform focusing entirely on taking startups from inception to Series A. Dreamstake identifies promising startups from universities and accelerators and provides them with access to the resources they need to achieve later stage success. This is achieved through a large programme run out of Google Campus in London and our own network of experts and investors.

foodtechLondon is considered a world leader in the launch and growth of high growth Fintech and Fashtech startups. Few people realise how successful the city is becoming in Foodtech. With a latge and vibrant foodie population situated side-by-side with a rapidly expanding tech community London is set to become the Foodtech capital of Europe.

Startup communities tend to thrive where there is a logic for them to be situated. This usually means that they have a large successful sector thtiving in close proximity to the resources required to build them into technology businesses. For example, London is strong in financial services and has therefore built a leading position in Fintech. The same applies to fashion. We tend to forget the third Ftech, Foodtech. London has all the ingredients necessary to create a thriving Foodtech eco-system.

So what makes London so special in this domain? We have a very large, prosperous population with a huge appetite for some of the most diverse cuisines in the world. This has created an amazing opportunity to offer all sorts of culinary experiences, exactly where and when people demand them. In the midst of this melting pot we have a highly developed technology startup scene and the investor community needed to fuel growth. This has lead to the emergence of a whole host of providers covering everything from insect protein through to vertical farming. We already have our own food delivery unicorns such as Just Eat and Deliveroo with hundreds of new players emerging all the time.

For investors there are a whole host of opportunites to look at, including; food ordering, restaurant management, supply chain and waste management, new food production techniques, new sources of protein, diet management and many others. Food is the world’s largest industry sector and is only set to grow. London is extremely well placed to be at the centre of the foodtech revolution.

We strongly urge founders to look at solving real problems across all points in the supply chain; from farm to fork to bin and not to limit themselves to simple delivery apps which is rapidly becoming a crowded market.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform focusing entirely on taking startups from inception to Series A. Dreamstake identifies promising startups from universities and accelerators and provides them with access to the resources they need to achieve later stage success. This is achieved through a large programme run out of Google Campus in London and mentoring with our own network of expert investors. We are currently running a Foodtech accelerator with Just Eat. Investors please register for demo day here.

 

 

great-gatsby-party

 

I read the recent blog by Bryce Roberts of O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, ‘Are we reaching the Limits of Silicon Valley’s Venture Model?’, in which he questioned the validity of the model.  As a Londoner with little connection to The Valley,  I realised that it was only one of many hundred recent blogs I have read from Silicon Valley VCs that recognised that the model might be broken.  It was refreshing to hear a VC actually take some responsibility for the current situation.

As an outsider, I would be a bit more blunt in my observation.  I guess Mattermark could confirm that over the past 20 years, Silicon Valley has consumed by far the highest ever level of resource in human history.  This has involved deploying trillions of dollars of capital in addition to concentrating some of the best minds from across the globe.  And the result?  A taxi app and a bed and breakfast app!  Before you shout that I don’t understand.  I do realize that Uber could be the basis for driverless cars and that VCs have been clever enough to spot this and pump in capital.  However, it is still only a taxi app. and it is quite possible that Tesla or someone new will get there first.  In the context of the trillions of capital and concentration of resource, is this really a great result and shouldn’t VCs take full responsibility for failing to invest in more significant opportunities?  It’s your bubble guys. No-one else is to blame.

Silicon Valley VCs are hypocritical in their approach to investment.  They dictate rules that they don’t observe themselves.  They insist that businesses are scaleable but have done nothing to ensure their own businesses are. They still invest in companies an hours drive from the office and employ little in the way of automation. It’s an old story. Turkeys don’t vote for Christmas and VCs don’t wish to put themselves out of a job.  They therefore insist that somehow VC is different from other professional services and can’t be automated by platforms or machine learning.  They have been guilty of extreme groupthink which has lead to a bubble.  Yes, sorry guys, it is a bubble. Just in case you haven’t noticed.

The bubble has been caused because of this groupthink.  It’s always the same. It goes back to the tulip bubble and has caused every bubble since. This time around it has been caused by an inability to take true risk on innovation, instead chucking capital into ‘me-too’ marketplaces and ‘safer’ business models. This groupthink happens because of a lack of diversity and the exclusion of wide ranging opinions. There is life outside The Valley in case no-one has noticed.

The rest of the world has some justification in being unsympathetic to The Valley and in particular Sand Hill Road.  You have sucked our resources for a few decades and risk spoiling our party too. You have given us the basis of our own startup revolution but any bubble threatens to take us down as well.

The solution?  Silicon Valley VCs need to admit that they are myopic in their approach. They can no longer kid themselves that somehow a bunch of bright people can change the world through concentrating capital based on their decisions.  The close-knit cluster has had its day. The internet will open it up, as it has the industries VCs invest in.  We should strive to reach the point where a founder building a startup in Nairobi will have equal access to resource as the college kid from Stanford. As VCs themselves say, ‘platforms change the world’.  This much is true.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

 

About 6 months ago I heard a presentation given at Campus London by Daniel Kraft from Singularity University.  A similar presentation from him can be found as a Ted Talk.  The talk blew my mind away and opened it up to the amazing possibilities facing the medical world from the exponential growth of several technologies in parallel.  The combination of low-cost gene analysis, improved computerised bio-informatics, robotics and increased connectivity will revolutionise the way we interact with medicine.

The amazing growth and connectivity of technologies such as connected digital medical records, robotic surgery, nano-medicine and genomics will provide us with a health eco-system that will allow greater emphasis on preventative health and re-direct medical budgets on improving quality of life rather than focusing it on the last few years of a patients existence.

Health services the world over struggle to deal with a variety of problems; increasing cost, unfavourable demographics, access variability, fragmentation, waste and the slow adoption of technology.  Technology can have a positive impact in addressing all these issues.

The increasing power of the smartphone alone is providing a new and increasing range of innovations. It is already possible to test for STDs, blood sugar levels and many other symptoms using sensors or patches linked to smartphone apps. Graphene patches will be even smaller and cheaper.  We are seeing a massive increase in the adoption of quantifiable self solutions. The popularity of wearable wristbands and smart-watches allow us to monitor our health in realtime and take preventative actions. It will not be long before clothing will incorporate sensors that will monitor all aspects of our health and warn us of any problems.

Another area of huge change is in imaging, which is getting increasingly faster and provides far higher resolution. This enables improved diagnosis and supports the surgeon in decision making.  Advanced robotics also provide surgeons with the tools to conduct operations that would not previously be possible.  This can be combined with internet connectivity to allow sharing of information by surgeons during surgical procedures.  Technologies such as augmented reality and even motion detection have potential in medicine, for example in detecting or monitoring stroke victims.

Medical scientists are also carrying out extremely advanced research on devices that allow brain-computer interface as a means for helping quadriplegic patients to restore certain functions.  Artificial retinas will help restore sight and robotics are either replacing or augmenting limbs.

The reduced cost of the genome sampling to less than $100 will allow us to predict the likelihood of developing certain hereditary disorders , this combined with environmental data, and will allow us to take preventative actions.

In general, technology offers the possibility to bring a new approach to medicine that focus resources on prediction and prevention, bringing a higher level of personalisation and participation.  In so doing, technology will increasingly help to empower patients, enable physicians and enhance wellbeing.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

 

 

Lean has served the startup world well and is still applicable to 90% of technology startups. It was designed for high growth, low capital intensive startups as defined by the likes of Steve Blank. It has never been for everyone but I find that it is often ignored through laziness or in some cases pure arrogance.

I would now argue that lean will also be adapted over time. In the case of really simple startups, I would suggest we will see a kind of leaner than lean approach, where the tech has zero cost (wix etc.) and it is quicker to simply build a product to test both problem/solution and product/market simultaneously.

The second area is highly complex products. As we move towards more impactful use of tech building an MVP will not always be possible. This could include hardware, chips, drones, blockchain etc. For the time being I will still relate all startups to the lean stages but with an open-mind in the above situations.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

 

Dreamrate

We would all like to be able to spot the next big startup success before anyone else.  We could be that smart investor who gets in first and makes millions or we could sign-up as a team member or co-founder. It’s also exciting to be able to compare notes with friends about the latest cool apps. But why does it matter to founders and why should they provide valuable data to people like us?

Validation is essential at all stages – We have moved away from the days when startups emerged from stealth mode to a surprised customer base. Unless you are involved in pure research or developing deep IP you need to be sure that other people buy into what you are doing. Ratings can determine where you are in the process. Have you established problem/solution fit or are you well on the way to scaling?  It is important to know. It will determine which investors you talk to and the valuation of the business.

It’s helpful to know where you are – You often don’t know what you don’t know. A rating system can help establish the gaps you need to plug.  You may be a single founder with a cool idea. However, if you don’t have the necessary technical experience you won’t build a successful business. A rating system can provide an objective view of where you stand in the startup lifecycle and help you to address issues.

It’s tough getting discovered – You will need your startup to be discovered by investors, potential team members, the media and customers. The startup world is becoming increasingly crowded. There are millions of apps submitted to the App Store and without a objective ways of listing and rating it is impossible to be discovered.

It helps investors build portfolios – Investors need to diversify their risk. They do this by spreading their investment across a broad portfolio of companies. However, it is extremely hard for them to know which startups to invest in. Most investors will not attend generic networking events in the hope of discovering a winner. It just is not good use of their time. They will also not read unsolicited business plans from startup founders. They simply can’t see the wood for the trees and have no objective way to evaluate what’s been sent to them.

A rating system enables all interested parties to ‘discover’ the next big thing.  It allows us to categorise our database and curate deal-opportunities to investors that are interested in specific sectors or funding stages. If you would like to be discovered we would encourage you to create a startup profile on our platform. Each month we select the most promising startups to pitch at Hoxton Hotel London. We also match startups to angels or VCs depending on the funding stage.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

 

 

The startup eco-system has always been about concentrating resources around great founders. First it was Silicon Valley followed by around-about 20 other cities across the globe. It was then realised that this was not enough and we saw a proliferation of accelerators, some stretching out to the developing economies. These individual ‘dots’ are vitally important to the health of the global startup scene. The next phase is to join the dots and it will be the internet that enables this.

Silicon Valley gave us all an insight to the model needed to create successful startups. The Valley concentrated resources within a few hours drive of Sand Hill Road where the VCs were based.  Investors could keep an eye on their portfolio companies, which were formed by founders from Stanford and Berkeley universities. The Valley acted as a magnet for talent from across the globe and sucked in resources from other economies.

Other cities such as New York, London and Tel Aviv sought to copy the formula and tech tech clusters were formed. Silicon Valley was still dominant and often pulled in mature startups for funding.  This situation has been a great benefit to The Valley but has drawn resources away from other centres.

Accelerators, are effectively micro-clusters.  They concentrate resources around specific startups, wherever they are formed.  An accelerator run in, say Nairobi, can attract the best local talent and give them the support they need. They can attract investors and mentors from across the globe.

Now platforms such as Dreamstake are joining the dots. Accelerators, angel networks, co-working spaces and a whole bunch of other initiatives are looking to deliver support and funding to startups wherever they are. They provide a useful concentration of resources but often lack the capital they need to fund the startups on their programmes.

The internet allows us to identify the best founder talent wherever it is and deliver resources on a global basis. This creates a meritocracy where location is no longer the only determinant of success. For the first time in history, a brilliant founder in Africa, can access the support needed to build a global business. This will go a long way to reducing poverty in many parts of the world.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

Black-woman-on-twitter-1000x666_0Apologies for the attention grabbing headline.  Dreamstake has just been selected to run a ‘Solve for X’ programme by Google, the objective of which is to solve a significant world problem. So no pressure there then! As I am not an economist I am going to need a lot of help from a whole bunch of experts. However, I have been involved in the startup world for 5 years and feel that I have at least earned the right to ask a few questions.

Firstly, my hypothesis is that the startup culture will have a major positive impact on the poorest communities in the world. Or put another way, I believe the culture can spread wealth far more evenly than ever before. However, the devil is in the detail and it would be useful to debate some current assumptions;

Are startups good? – Tech startups currently rule the world. Millenniums and many others no longer dream of a corporate career. Many want to take their lives into their own hands and aspire to change the world. It is widely recognised that corporations find it hard to innovate and much of the action is taking place in much more agile startup teams. However, with power comes responsibility and many startups sail close to the line of social acceptability.

The so-called ‘Sharing Economy’ is a point in case. Startups such as Uber and Airbnb have ruthlessly pursued market share in winner-takes-all industry sectors. Not much sharing there then. There is a conflict between the need of these startups to grow and the messaging to their consumer base that is much more idealistic in their objectives. Is it unhealthy that these companies are able to build such large war-chests to fight off challenges by others? Don’t these startups need to grow responsibly or risk losing the support of their own users?

I feel overwhelmingly positive about startup culture. However, it is not a license to act irresponsibly or a backdoor to outright capitalism without any checks and balances. If founders (and investors) do not recognise this they will undermine the whole startup movement.

Is the Silicon Valley model good? – Silicon Valley is the engine driving the startup economy. Not only has huge proportion of startup economic growth come out of Silicon Valley but many of the technologies and processes have been developed there. There is little doubt that the guiding principles of The Valley are positive. Success has been underpinned by principle that founders are given access to a pool of awesome talent, knowledgable support and almost unlimited capital.

However, The Silicon Valley model has resulted in group-think that ignores the huge limitations in the model for the rest of the world. The idea that resources have to be concentrated in clusters has a negative economic impact on much of society and is illogical in the age of the internet. Is it now possible for a bright entrepreneur in Lagos, armed with a copy of The Lean Startup to access many of the resources he needs to build a great business?

I would argue that internet based platforms will change the world of entrepreneurship (slightly biased as I run such a platform), in just the same way as they are changing so many other sectors.  The objective has to be to provide great founders, wherever they are, with the capital and support they need to build great businesses.

Can we spread the love? – For the first time in modern history we have the ability to spread out an economic system to a broad base of the population across all continents. The internet gives access to resources to the poorest communities across the globe. Startup culture has been packaged in a way that it can now be taught to entrepreneurs. The cost of technology has come down to a point where it is accessible to many.

We are already seeing how certain African nations have been able to leap-frog traditional western economies in fields such as mobile payments. The ubiquity of the smartphone has enabled these nations to jump technologies and offers the possibility of major innovation in areas such as banking.

I would conclude that we are on the verge of a startup revolution where Silicon Valley will either loosen it’s grip on the overall global scene or will respond by being less myopic in it’s approach. VCs need to lose the idea that they can only invest in startups on their own door-step and provide greater support to ventures outside traditional clusters. Platforms will allow entrepreneurs to access resources wherever they are and this will create something approaching a true meritocracy.

We are approaching the most interesting phase of the internet where it’s influence will be felt on a much broader scale. We need to build a global eco-system, joining the dots between the current clusters and the rest of the world.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

 

The London startup scene is buzzing with activity and we are all seeing a lot of press around the big-name startups. However there are also many  impressive early-stage startups coming through the system and the Dreamstake team is often the first to spot them.  We have presented over 150 companies at Google Campus in the last 18 months as well as a slightly smaller number at our HoxTech Angels investment sessions. We feel sure that many of these startups will break into big time and represent great opportunities for investors looking for the next tech super-stars. There are too many great companies to list them all but here are just a few that have grabbed our attention:

WishWant allows you to create small gift collections for special occasions such as birthdays, Christmas or weddings. You select the price of gift you want to give and are presented with a selection of individualist suggestions that have all been selected by founders, Tanya and Ksenia. The great thing is that you can send a selection of between 4 and 12 ideas to the recipient for them to chose the perfect gift to suit their personal taste. Your selection is offered in a stylishly designed mini-catalogue which can be customised by the sender and delivered by mail or email.

Lobster is a highly innovative social content marketplace that allows people to monetise the photos and videos from their social media activities. This allows agencies and brands to tap into a huge pool of quality images and avoid the use of photo stock which is often boring and cliched. Lobster has a strong management team based in the UK with technical resources in Central Europe. We have been watching them for over a year now and believe that they have a highly scaleable business.

Vinoa are an innovative wine subscription service that have just closed their seed round. They provide consumers with 4 monthly wine tasting samples packaged to go through a standard letterbox. The user pays a fixed monthly subscription and gets to taste a varied selection of wines from across the globe. Although the proposition sounds simple the Vinoa team has had to develop proprietary equipment to ensure that the wine is decanted without a deterioration in quality. Vinoa have announced partnerships with a national newspaper and specialist magazines.

Seldon sit at the more serious end of the spectrum. They are a team of highly experienced data scientists who have packaged their knowledge of algorithms in a way that enterprise clients can access their IP to help make creating recommendations engines quicker and cheaper. The underlying platform is open-source which allows developers easy access to the code. Enterprise clients can upgrade to get higher levels of support when needed.

Smartzer bring a rich experience to the customers of brands by giving access to shoppable content. The technology adds an interactive overlay to the clients content, allowing customers to instantly see more information and purchase products by clicking them in a video or image. The company provides a personal service, where they customize the clients player to emulate their website and tag the video, delivering an embeddable shoppable video player. Smartzer are already working for major fashion brands, including Whistles.

Grabble has been receiving a great deal of attention from the press, with coverage from the Evening Standard , Forbes, The Telegraph and several others. The app has been called the ‘Tinder’ for fashion and allows you to grab items that you love and get notifications when they drop in price. The Grabble team also provides users with daily trend edits. Grabble have recently raised a significant seed round and we expect to see great things coming out of a strong team.

If you would like to know more about emerging startups, keep an eye on Dreamstake.  All new startups are featured on the activity feed as they are launched on the platform. If you have a startup and would like to be considered for funding support, please create a startup profile on Dreamstake.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.