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Pitch

TL:DR: Early stage founders tend to use the same playlist before approaching angels for investment. However, it’s not enough to simply tick boxes. Focus your effort on the sections that investors are really interested in.

We have been helping early stage technology founders for over 5 years now. During this time things have changed. It used to be possible for founders to focus their pitch on an idea and gain investment by simply creating a good deck. As we then went through the app phase, pitch decks became productised and focused on approximately 10 key elements (The Dave McClure Deck is a good example). However, this can often lead to disappointment as founders feel they have ticked all the boxes and still fail to interest anyone.

Early stage founders are normally advised to create pitch decks covering the following sections;

Problem, Solution, Market, Competition, Team, Business model, Financials, Roadmap and The ask.

Founders very often put far too much emphasis on ‘the solution’. Investors are much more interested in other sections of the deck;

Team

Investors want to know that they are investing in a strong founder and a team that can execute against the plan. They look for founders with relevant experience and an open-mindedness to new ideas. Investors will obsess about the team and look for gaps. As startups focus on deeper technologies such as AI or machine learning, investors will expect to see specialists in the team. We would advise founders to obsess on this element of the pitch. If they don’t have every skill covered they can compensate by having strong advisors to fill the gaps. Don’t bluff about having skills that you don’t possess. It will come back to bite you.

Problem

Investors want to know that you really understand the problem that you are solving. Too many founders believe that they have identified a large problem that users will pay to solve. They jump to building an MVP, only to find that the problem is insignificant or users already have better ways to solve it. It is worth spending time understanding the problem in depth before building any tech. This can be done at minimal expense using open questioning and other techniques (see The Lean Startup).

Market opportunity and timing

A product can easily be introduced to the market either too early or too late. If there is well established competition you are probably too late. The speed of innovation is accelerating and if are competing against similar propositions with VC backing you may have missed the boat. You can look at deficiencies of existing products and as long as you can get a 10x improvement it could be worth continuing. It is also possible to be too early. Google Glass is an example of this. It can be risky for investors to invest in pure research from universities where there is no clear roadmap for commercialisation. Finally, investors are looking to invest in startups that address very large and growing markets or in new markets that can be massive.

When preparing a pitch deck focus on these 3 areas and make sure you can provide all the answers to any questions that investors may throw at you. Remember, it’s not enough to simply have good words on a deck. Although the deck is a marketing document, the information needs to reflect the true state of the startup and demonstrate your awareness of the domain that you are involved in.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform focusing entirely on taking startups from inception to Series A. Dreamstake identifies promising startups from universities and other accelerators and provides them with access to the resources they need to achieve later stage success. This is achieved through a large programme run out of Google Campus in London and our own network of experts and investors. We run corporate accelerators on behalf of clients and have recently supported Just Eat with a Foodtech accelerator.

Lean 2.0The Lean Startup by Eric Ries and other such works provided a great playbook for the last wave of internet startups. They detailed a clear methodology that founders could follow when developing reasonably simple technologies to address consumer needs. We have therefore seen a whole generation of startups executed using this highly effective approach. The lean methodology made launching a startup relatively simple for even a novice because it was possible to follow a series of simple well defined steps from validating the idea to scaling up.

The startup scene went through a transformational shift during 2016. We saw a move away from these relatively simple consumer apps to more substantial technologies such as AI and machine learning. These demand a more complex set of relationships to get them to market, often involving universities, education and health services, corporates and regulatory bodies.

However, the processes for creating startups have not adapted to reflect this. Peter Thiel’s, Zero-to-one and Steve Case’s, The Third Wave, do a good job of describing the changes we are encountering but don’t give much guidance for creating startups in this environment. Both point to the idea that we will be using deeper technologies to solve big problems and therefore suggest that lean methodologies will are too incremental in approach to deliver the complexity required. However, this is of little help if you are talking to investors about getting funding for your big idea.

This year, 2017, will see the mass adoption of technologies such as AI, AR/VR, Robotics, Blockchain and Genomics. Startups leveraging such technologies will no longer be able to slavishly follow the lean methodology. It is simply not designed to accomodate complex partnerships and development cycles needed in the next phase. Firstly, I would predict that universities will play a greater role in conducting the pure research needed to get these technologies to a point where they are commercially viable. Therefore Lean 2.0 will need to accommodate partnerships in a way that the original Lean is unable to do.

I think the key to this next stage of internet development is ‘Startup Culture’ itself. We have seen how startup founders have an amazing capacity to move mountains when they set out to do so. They are also prepared to take risk in a way that cannot happen in the corporate environment. I therefore feel that any new methodology needs to promote this ‘can do’ execution oriented approach but apply it to commercialising the deep research coming out of the academic sector.

Europe and London in particular is well placed to lead this next wave. We have strong universities that well connected and close to a vibrant startup scene. We need to think more about how startups will develop in a more technology driven environment and make sure that Governments encourage the right approach. We also need to adapt our own methodologies so as not to lose the agility that we have built up over the last few years.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform focusing entirely on taking startups from inception to Series A. Dreamstake identifies promising startups from universities and accelerators and provides them with access to the resources they need to achieve later stage success. This is achieved through a large programme run out of Google Campus in London and our own network of experts and investors.

TL:DR – It’s not the next Bourne movie but refers to the error of Government support for businesses that are quite capable of supporting themselves.

bourneIn UK there seems to be a misconception that scale-ups need support. This came about because for a while we were failing to create unicorns and exits such as IPOs or major trade sales. Government sought advice from consultancies who not unsurprisingly came up with the conclusion that it was because startups needed more support to scale. However, this misses the real issue. The quantity of scale-ups relates directly to the number of quality startups coming through the system and we were simply not creating enough early stage activity.

Approximately 10 years ago the UK Government started to put major effort into the technology startup community, partly through TechCity and focusing on East London. This has been a success and the area now has a vibrant technology startup scene. Other areas of the UK have also benefited with tech clusters in university cities such as Oxford and Cambridge. However, a couple of years ago Government started to consult the eco-system players and came to the conclusion that there was a lack of support for later stage businesses. This has lead to the re-direction of resources into this sector and neglect of the real issues.

Startups develop in eco-systems which bring together resources to stimulate growth. This is largely a numbers game. The more startups that are created, the more unicorns you are likely to encounter. It is also a meritocracy. Only the best survive and this is how it should be. London has an extremely strong supporting eco-system for scaling startups with at least 100 VC funds with more than enough capital and capability to support any startups that are able to demonstrate sufficient product/market fit for scaling. We do not have a Series A crunch. We have a problem of not enough startups meeting the criteria of the VC community.

Businesses that do reach series A are normally extremely capable. They are also naturally provided with the resources to scale without the need for interference from Government or big five consultancies who have little right to be in this space at all.

There are still consideable issues at the startup phase. Great progress is being made in commercialising university IP using startup culture as the success driver. However, there is still a huge amount of work to be done in this field. The UK has traditionally been great at pure R&D but has lagged behind in getting these innovations to market and has often lost out to Silicon Valley and other eco-systems. We are now entering a phase where we can lead on frontier technologies such as AI, Machine Learning, AR/VR, Blockchain, Robotics and IOT. However, we need to do far more to address the university /startup interface and get these technologies to market.

I would argue that the current focus on scaleups is completely misguided. More resources need to be put into stimulating the commercialisation of the excellent work coming out of our universities and early stage startup eco-system. We should stop wasting money on management consultancies, accountants and other organisations that don’t play a natural part in the eco-system and we should ensure that early stage businesses are not starved of the technical and financial resources they need to thrive.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform focusing entirely on taking startups from inception to Series A. Dreamstake identifies promising startups from universities and accelerators and provides them with access to the resources they need to achieve later stage success. This is achieved through a large programme run out of Google Campus in London and our own network of experts and investors.

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The last 10 years have been dominated by the lean startup. Often inexperienced and under-qualified founders have been over-funded and hyped by VCs to create startups that claim to change the world but deliver questionable value to society. This second wave of the internet democratized the startup scene and reduced the barriers to entry to enable the rise of the unicorn culture. Unfortunately, we can only deal with so many social apps, two-sided markets and sharing economy propositions and now the pendulum is swinging in the other direction.

The likes of Steve Blank and Eric Reis did an amazing job of making startup building accessible to anyone with enough entrepreneurial flair and drive. Access to internet cloud-based hosting and mobile platforms reduced the cost to play and provided unprecedented access to markets. Venture capital firms saw the potential and jumped on the band-wagon. Without doubt this phase has produced awesome change and many notable successes.

The last couple of years have seen some dampening of the market, especially in Silicon Valley. Although, it looks like a full bubble has been avoided the appetite for new consumer apps is plateauing and VCs are increasingly focused on managing their existing portfolios, particularly at later stage.

This tightening of the market has coincided with a period of significant technological change. In a difficult market there is always a tendency to focus on investing in real IP which has an improved risk profile and VCs are now shifting their interest into these areas. The recent report on The State of European Tech 2016 by Atomico confirms these trends.

The third wave of the internet will harness technologies such as AI, AR/VR, Genome Sampling, Blockchain, Robotics, Autonomous Vehicles, Graphene and other deep technologies to solve some of the big challenges facing society. This will demand a different approach to supporting and building startups. The lean methodology will have to be adapted to support more complex development cycles and teams with a deeper technical focus.

Europe and particularly the UK is in a good position to exploit these changes, with several world class universities and a strong reputation for advanced R&D. The UK Government seems committed to supporting this with increased funding and there is a growing trend of graduates moving directly into building startups following their university studies.

These trends will involve a huge shift in mindset both from existing founders and investors. It is going to become increasingly difficult to take scrappy lean startups to market with a simple combination of capital and hype. Founders will need to manage teams with real technical depth over longer timeframes and this will have implications on the way investment is secured and channeled. Investors will need to get better at spotting teams earlier in the cycle and providing commercial guidance. Partnering will come back to the fore as many of these technologies require a complex web of participants to get to market. Think autonomous vehicles or virtual reality which will often require combining hardware, software and content to deliver the whole experience.

We can be immensely positive about the technological changes we are about to experience. They will bring a healthier and better educated society, wth ever reducing poverty across the globe. However, there will be increased polarisation in western societies between those that can understand and exploit these deeper technologies and those left behind. The startup community needs to be aware of this and show some leadership in spreading the benefits more widely.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform matching over 16,000 founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders create profiles on the platform and get curated introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

MeStartups change the world! It’s impossible to over-estimate the impact that technology startups have on our lives. We are on the cusp of a period where exponential technologies will combine to solve some of the world’s really pressing problems. Technology is simply the enabler and I believe that it is startup culture that really moves mountains. People such such as Elon Musk are undaughted by technology challenges. They simply spot an opportunity to make things better and go for it. This is what startup culture is all about. Unfortunately, this culture is often misunderstood and I would argue is under threat on both sides of the Atlantic.

Startups are finely tuned machines that are driven by a passion to succeed. Founders risk everything to follow their dreams but can easily be thrown of track if the eco-system is unsupportive. They rely on access to the best minds, freely available capital, support from experienced mentors and a strong user base.

Both Silicon Valley and London both face challenges in accessing the talent needed to build great startups. Opposition to immigration sits at the core of the problem. Both Brexit and Trump are a misguided reaction to the success of startup culture and it’s ability to bring change. In middle England and the mid-west there is little appetite for this pace of change and startup founders are often seen as spoilt brats with little entitlement to their success.

The UK Government, through Brexit, seeks to restrict immigration with the argument that we can create our own talent. They talk about introducing processes for admitting highly skilled people. However, this simply won’t work with startups. Successful founders often have no formal qualifications. Ten of the most successful leaders in world all dropped out of college. Would we have blocked their admittance to the UK on the basis they were under qualified? Entrepreneurs are risk takers who often leave their home country to set up business where they see an opportunity to build something of value. The London startup scene is packed with these inspiring young leaders who represent the future engine of growth for the UK economy. If we pull the rug from under them it will be to the disadvantage of all.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech accelerator platform matching over 16,000 founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders create profiles on the platform and get curated introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

technologyIt’s funny but in the startup world we use the word exponential a lot. We talk about the exponential growth of startups and the power of exponential technologies. However, I would argue that apart from Silicon Valley the eco-systems themselves just don’t hack it. Why are we not seeing exponential growth of the eco-systems? Even the shining stars such as London and New York see only moderate progress from a low base. Tech investment is still an extremely small asset class and VCs are almost a cottage industry within the broader financial services industry. So what is required to change?

It is well worth looking at London as a case study because it has been successful by many measures. The Government has been highly supportive through tax breaks and other incentives and has been effective in promoting the city as a technology startup cluster. However, this has still only created modest growth from a slow start rather the exponential growth we should expect from such efforts. I don’t believe that we can rely on Government to make this happen. Much of what has been achieved in technology innovation over the centuries has been the result of individual human endeavour rather than Government intervention.

If we look to Silicon Valley we see that growth comes from within the eco-system. It’s all about the drive of key individuals and leveraging the power of paying forward. In my view, it is the established founders that have the means to drive exponential growth from the eco-system. They can do this by continuing to engage with the startup eco-system after their first successes. This can be achieved by starting their next venture or by supporting others to create theirs.

We have had massive support for our programme from established founders such as William Reeves, Tom Allason, David Buttress, Nic Cary and others. However, we need to change the mindset and start to expect exponential growth of our eco-system. This will require far greater support for emerging entrepreneurs from people who have been there and done it before. It requires a step-change in ambition. We should look to emulate the likes of Elon Musk and unleash the full potential of innovators.

So some concrete suggestions;

  • Join the dots between the key players; established entrepreneurs, emerging founders, universities, investors, corporates etc.
  • Engage successful founders more proactively as investor mentors. We need our own Paypal Mafia
  • Educate investors in tech investment as an asset class to increase liquidity in the sector
  • Raise the ambition level by promoting a vision for technology in schools, universities and society in general

As always the answer lies in the power of the network and the ability to make connections. The Silicon Valley model works. We just need to take the best elements and adapt them for other markets. We have created a database of the key influencers in the London Technology scene and are reaching out to involve them in projects involving the best startups on our platform. If you feel you have something to contribute to our mission please reach out to us.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech startup platform to match over 16,000 founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders create profiles on the platform and get curated introductions to investors. We are constantly looking to support great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

Me

The whole concept of democratising capital is very compelling but does it really work?  The UK has led the way in equity based crowdfunding, with firms such as Crowdcube and Seedrs in the forefront of the trend. Now other nations are set to follow, but does it really work?  What are the alternatives?

I am a great believer in the idea that platforms change the world.  We see this with the likes of Uber and Airbnb.  Platforms are great for aggregating the market and reducing the cost to serve. They are very efficient and can grow rapidly through network effect. AngelList has achieved great things in the US as a professional funding platform but has failed to achieve such strong traction in the UK.

I have often observed that VCs don’t exactly eat their own dog food when it comes to building scaleable businesses for themselves. Platforms can change all this and make it possible for investors to engage directly with founders.

However, I would argue that equity crowdfunding has severe limitations.  There are simply not enough high quality startups to sustain the existing players. This will lead to compromising acceptance criteria and higher risk for investors. Investors have reduced control in the crowdfunding model and are less likely to have the skills to carry out the same level of due diligence.

Crowdfunding also relies very highly on market hype.  The man in the street will only invest in high risk tech if he believes that he is investing in a future unicorn. Once the heat goes out of the market, the stimulus to participate disappears.

Angel Investment is highly technical and only sophisticated investors fully understand the the need to diversify their investment across a broad portfolio limiting overall investment to a small percentage of their overall capital.  Investing in one or two startups on a crowdfunding platform will almost certainly result in losing the original capital investment.

Founders love crowdfunding because they believe that they will get a better valuation and access to a broader base of investors.  They also get the opportunity to build user base during the fundraising process. However, most platforms recommend that founders bring their own investors before launch.  Sophisticated Investors will increasingly refuse to play ball because the process is against their interests. We have seen a couple of high profile founders pull their crowdfunding campaigns due to lack interest from investors. This can be a disaster because it signals failure to the whole market.

So what’s the choice?

Professional funding platforms such as Dreamstake provide certain advantages to investors and founders;

  • We work with the founders over many months to get to know them, providing support through Dreamstake Academy and other activities. This allows us to conduct proper due diligence.
  • We have built a database of qualified investors and a high understanding of their investment preferences
  • We provide tools such as a dealroom to help investors build the round
  • We match deal flow through to the most appropriate investors and therefore increase the chances of success
  • We allow lead investors to set the term-sheet and negotiate the valuation

Professional funding platforms offer many of the same advantages of crowdfunding platforms. They aggregate both investor and startup databases and matchmake to increase the probability of closing the round.  They deploy the experience of sophisticated investors  to carry out due diligence and ensure that terms are balanced. Only time will tell whether crowdfunding becomes the norm. Angel and VC represent a tiny percentage of the overall investment market. This is largely determined by the number of investment opportunities. I would rather see innovative ways for institutions to deploy capital into venture than open up investment to investors who are going to get burnt.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech startup platform to match over 16,000 founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders create profiles on the platform and get curated introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

 

Everyone knows the innovators dilemma.  As companies grow they lose the ability to innovate. The odds are stacked against them as shareholders tell the management team to stick to the knitting. All desire to take risk evaporates and suddenly they find they have been disrupted by a nimble startup. Just look at what Airbnb has done to transform the travel sector, or Uber in transport.

More and more big corporations are beginning to recognise how important it is to get involved with early stage tech startups. Big names such as Telefonica and Barclays have started to build collaborations between themselves and startups with the very clear strategy of exploring new technologies and innovative business models.

MassChallenge produced an interesting report that shows a shift in the dynamics in the behaviour of corporates towards embracing startup culture in the U.S. The same trends are perceptible in Europe and in particular the UK and we have clearly identified a number of corporate strategies happening here :

The ‘GodFather’ approach: Google operates a whole building to nurture startups – Campus London has 5 floors of event space, free and not so free co-working places, plus offices for a couple of London accelerator funds. A sort of micro silicon valley ecosystem on the edge of the City of London.

The ‘ Getting them early’ approach’: Early stage accelerators are quite a popular model for big corporates. They increasingly focus on niche market segments rather than generic technology and only take the startups that have a direct value to the corporates. They usually partner with large strategic players and they take equity in exchange for subsidence capital. A recent example is the last fashion tech accelerator by Asos , who is partnering with Wayra.

The ‘Lets see what happens’ approach is an interesting model that is taken mainly by financial institutions or players with deep pockets, sometimes resulting in non-equity accelerators.  These nurture startups, usually from a specific niche, such as Fintech.  The main goal is to keep an eye on what’s happening and potential make an investment in the future. They try to build goodwill by giving a lot of value in the form of free office, mentoring and PR. A good example is Winton Capital, that have recently put through their first cohort of ‘big data startups’.

Most corporate accelerators are roughly based on the Y-Combinator model. This involves picking limited size cohorts and providing light mentoring for a set period of time. The goal is usually to introduce the startups to investors at a ‘demo day’ at the end of the programme. Common problems in running accelerators include; poor picking of startups,  bad mentoring and lack of investor interest at the end of the programme.

Dreamstake is able to draw on a community of over 2,000 startups reaching across Europe through a virtual ecosystem. We also bring 10 years of startups experience which we are willing to share with corporate clients looking to harness the potential of early stage technology.

FoodTech or Internet of Food is one of the fastest growing startup categories, changing the way we find, prepare, order, ship, and consume food and beverages. Here are just a few examples of the most common trends and tech startups doing innovative things and trying to disrupt the food ecosystem.

Food Delivery

We all know the big players like Deliveroo or JustEat , who deliver us delicious dishes from local restaurants, but is there anyone helping us with grocery shopping? Here are a couple of our startups, who are trying different approaches:

Grocemania is a startup that is connecting stores to local couriers. They are highlighting the groceries on their own e-commerce platform. You can buy online and get all of it delivered by your local courier.

Caper are focusing their proposition on your current locations and quality of the shops. You can order the best groceries and get them delivered from your favourite local stores under 60 minutes.

Big data

There are also some interesting big data players in the food sector trying to collect and analyse food data:

Fuuduru is a real time, location based discovery site where users’ can discover what’s happening in food right now, from the latest food trend to what chefs, restaurants, foodies & businesses are saying. It is a great way for customers to socialise and keep up to date with new dishes, local places, but also a great data source of analytics for food businesses.

Foodi  is a tech company that aims at connecting customers and restaurateurs using mobile Apps and cloud services. Their platform allows customers to order and pay using mobile phones, and gives businesses powerful analytics and a dedicated advertising channel through which they can drive more sales.

Alternative Food Marketplaces

Imagine, that you could shop your food directly from the farmers. MarketSnapp seems to have an interesting approach for that. You can now shop from your local market online, from the comfort of your sofa. It’s an online retail platform for market & street sellers with the added benefit of Click & Collect. They offer a free platform, that helps to raise awareness for local farmers and retailers disrupting the eco system of the food trade.

Food Cooking

Cooking is a great hobby to have and was always a big movement within food tech startups. There are a few startups that are making cooking easier, healthier and faster than ever before! Imagine that you could find recipes you love in seconds and get those ingredients delivered to your door immediately. Foodzube  and Whisk are doing exactly that, which its effectively the innovative and disruptive way of cooking and a whole new way of grocery shopping!

This blog post is writen by Marina Atarova, the co-founder of Dreamstake. I mentor our startups through bootcamps and events. I also help to get them funded through our Hoxtech Angel Club. I have organised the FoodTech Funding Forum on 28.07, where I will have foodtech superstar investors and entrepreneurs debating on subjects around investment for early stage startups. Please sign up here.

UNiIn his recent book, The Third Wave, Steve Case talks about the way the next generation of technology startups will focus on solving the really big issues facing society. He points to the fact that the first wave was all about setting up the basic building blocks of the internet by big players such as Cisco, Microsoft and AOL. The second wave saw the rise of the stand alone app startups such as Uber and Airbnb and a whole host of less significant players. The third wave will use this platform to transform sectors such as health and education

The education system in many developed nations has changed little in past 300 years. It was designed at the height of the British dominance as a way of equipping diplomats with the skills they needed to run a huge sprawling empire. This system is arguably no longer fit for purpose for a modern technology enabled society where students need new and quickly changing skillsets.

Technology offers huge potential to radically improve the learning experience and equip students with the skills they will need in the next decade.

Trends to watch include flipped learning, where students learn from video at home and attend school to do their homework with the help of educators, adaptive and personalised learning and student generated content. This transformation will be driven by the interaction of a number of exponential technologies that will come together to deliver an entirely different learning experience. Big Data and Machine learning will help educators to predict learning requirements and tailor content for specific student needs. The huge increase in video bandwidth will enable Virtual Reality experiences that are more engaging and will improve the learning experience. Coding schools are already creating a generation that is more familiar with software and will set high expectations about the rest of the curiculum which is rarely aligned to the needs of employers in the digital age.

The biggest challenges will not be technology based. Edtech founders currently face long sales cycles and a system that is reluctant to take risks. Steve case believes the third wave will be all about partnering. Founders will have to become effective at building relationships with Government agencies, educational establishments and other stakeholders. However, I am confident that we are entering a period of rapid transformation where a quality education can be delivered to a broader cross-section of society.

Blog by Paul Dowling — Co-Founder of Dreamstake the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.