Archives for category: UX

It is true, that these days with enough patience you can learn absolutely any business skill online or offline, but where to find workshops for internet startups that’d be of great value for time and money?

There are all sort of online and offline workshops for internet startups and digital entrepreneurs, offered by ed tech (educational technology) startups and some very established players. I would like to highlight a couple of sources that I still myself, if I need to quickly freshen up my skills.

General Assembly London. Originally out of New York, these guys are now also fully established in London. You can attend all sort of useful sessions for technology entrepreneurs to learn skills from coding to growth hacking. Their prices start from about 15GBP per one session. You can also attend their full time courses over several weeks and become a certificated professional i.e. User Experience or Programming.

Coursera. Wanna learn from a Yale professor about financial markets or discover recent case studies in business analytics with Accenture? No problem, you can now do it online from your sofa for a very affordable price or sometimes even free. This company has international universities on board producing their online workshops, many of which are not only useful for digital businesses, but will help to build any professional skills.

LinkdIn’s Lynda.comOnline learning portal Lynda has been acquired by linkedin this past spring and is slowly becoming a well established online destination for anyone incl. digital and technology entrepreneurs wishing to polish their business skills and set up business online incl.  coding, online marketing , design, video etc. Their subscription model is very affordable for anyone and their range of online workshops is very wide with tutors from all countries and backgrounds.

Digital Business Academy is pretty much the  new offer from the British Government, which is trying really hard to support internet startups and digital entrepreneurs. They have a full range of online tutorials about how to start a business online. The great thing about it is that it is not only free but also produced mostly by established entrepreneurs from the tech industry. Seems that they know what they are talking about and have great case studies and practical examples.

Dreamstake Academy - we have been running free workshops for tech entrepreneurs and digital startups for three years. Since then we have had a chance to learn what are the most important and valuable for our entrepreneurs.  It is a free non-profit project and we now have some of the best tutors from all over Europe supporting us. We run up to 4 workshops for entrepreneurs per day with subjects including anything from Business Model Canvas to VC and angel funding for early stage tech businesses. You can become a member and sign up here.

Blog by Marina Atarova, Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every month.

geeksAs a startup founder, working with other startup founders, on a day to day basis, I get a huge amount of exposure to the European startups scene. I probably met upwards of 1000 startup founders in the past year. After at least 20 years in corporate life as a salesman and then management consultant I am in a good position to see the benefits of startup life;

  • The founders have vision and passion - The best startup founders are on a mission.  They have identified a problem or opportunity and will risk everything to ensure that they address it. They usually have immense positive energy and have the ability to motivate others to follow their vision.
  • Startups change  the way we live - In most walks of life it is difficult to make a real impact. Startups can bring radical change within relatively short timescales and with a small injection of capital. We only have to look at companies such as Facebook, Twitter, Uber, Airbnb and Instagram to see the diversity of change that is possible.
  • They shake up existing companies – Startups have little respect for the status quo. The taxis in San Francisco were awful; Uber gave a great alternative. The banks and other near-monopolies will be next. There are already startups nibbling away at the non-core activities of these monolithic businesses, providing customers with a better customer experience at a lower cost. It will not be long before startups will disrupt any business that does not provide exceptional service.
  • They are a creative learning process – Working on a startup is a constant learning experience. Small team sizes mean that everyone works on every aspect of the business. The environment is dynamic and subject to constant change as competitors emerge and market conditions change. Startup founders have to be highly creative, to imagine new solutions, unique business models and innovative processes.
  • They are a great environment to work in - Startups are a very different working environment to most enterprises. There is no time for politics or egos. The most important thing is getting the job done as effectively as possible. Startups are finely balanced and there is little room for hanger-oners. The pressure is invigorating and no two days are the same.

Enterprises are increasingly finding it difficult to innovate in the face of competition from smaller more nimble competition. Startups represent an alternative way of organising resources which provides more fulfilment to founder teams and employees and deliver accelerated results. There is little doubt that life in a startup can be extremely tough and is not for everyone. However, for many of us there is nothing else that comes close.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every last Monday of the month.

 

laserStartup founders are like elite athletes. They drive hard to acheive high performance or they don’t make the grade. We all know that the chances of survival for an early stage tech startup are extremely slim. The only way to improve the odds is to focus 100% on doing the right things. You need to do more than just read The Lean Startup. You can apply similar principles to every aspect of the business. We have helped over 500 startups over the past 3 years and have found that the following tips can make the difference between failure and success;

  • Do you have what it takes? - Are you the type of person who can focus 100% on one thing? Are you able to work 70 hour weeks for months on end. Great founders do not have to be academically accomplished. They do need to be able follow a vision with single minded passion and execute their ideas effectively. Founders should look very carefully at themselves and decide if this is what they want. Remember there is no safety net and no opportunity to take your foot off the gas.
  • Take on focused people - It’s no good being the only one in the team that is prepared to work. Find people who are equally committed and will share in the pain. Look for people who are better than you and who can complement your skills. There is no room for ego’s, either theirs or yours. The team needs to focus on getting the job done in the most effective way possible. Look for good product, UX and technical people who will keep the startup on course and make sure that their rewards are aligned to achieving a successful outcome.
  • Follow the right advice - Accurate and focused advice is like gold-dust but it is often extremely hard to access. Poor advice is worse than no advice at all. Start by accessing reputable online sources such as Steve Blank, Eric Ries, Paul Graham and David Rose. Don’t spend too much time on conceptual works like Crossing the Chasm. Remember this is all about focusing on practical solutions. Look for advisors with deep sector or technical knowledge but watch out for ‘consultants’ who may not be up-to-date with current business models or technology. Be very hard on potential advisors, even if they come through a programme such as an accelerator. Who you listen too is extremely important. It’s always a good idea to engage with people who have been there and done it before.
  • Keep the product simple – Products are becoming simpler. Uber, Airbnb and snapchat are all single function tools designed to solve easily identifiable problems. The Lean Startup helps here. Make sure you are solving a real issue that other people agree is a problem and will pay to solve. Obsess on this and validate rigorously with an MVP until you have a business model that works. If you can’t find one, fail fast and go back to the drawing board. Don’t pump capital into an idea that hasn’t been thoroughly tested.
  • Practice lean funding – Narrow down your routes to funding. Most founders spend months talking to investors who are never going to invest. Understand who is right for the stage you are at and has the right sector focus. Make sure you are talking to real investors and not consultants. Check that angels are currently investing and not invested out.

So do a startup effectively is all about keeping it as simple as possible. Strip down everything to the raw essentials and focus on these at all times. Avoid scope-creep where nice-to-have functions take over from the core propositions. Don’t engage in protracted partnership discussions during the early phases and be generally cautious  about offering meetings unless they get you closer to achieving your immediate goals. It’s easy to be be flattered into taking a meeting but it often takes your eye off the ball. Maintaining laser sharp focus for you and your team will greatly improve your chances of startup success.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every last Monday of the month.

 

 

 

gerkinThere have been plenty of articles about why London is a great place to set up a FinTech startup but I thought it would be fun to look at it from a different angle. I believe that the whole London startup eco-system can benefit from a strong Fintech sector. The City has the potential to seed a thriving tech scene in much the way that Silicon Valley was seeded by Stanford university, Hewlett Packard and other hardware firms in the middle of last century.

Injection of capital - FinTech startups are more likely to attract capital than any other sector in London. There is a lot of individual wealth in The City as well as institutional investors. This capital is far more likely to be invested in a sector that is easily understood and in startups that solve problems that can be related too.  This represents a quick way into the startup scene for City guys who want a piece of the startup action. This new source of capital will gradually spread across other startup sectors as the investors become more confident and want to diversify their risk more broadly.

The redeployment of talent - The City attracts the best talent from across the globe. A small percentage redeployment of these human resources into the startup community will have a huge impact. FinTech is the sector that is most likely to precipitate this effect because it is smaller jump than other types of tech startup. We find that ex City people can make excellent startup founders. They are often extremely well educated and have the necessary drive to build a successful venture. A shift of resources from corporate tech to tech startups will improve the general gene-pool and lead to a greater number of startup success stories.

Fertile source of ideas - FinTech represents a great way for the startup world to add real value. The financial sector is long overdue an overhaul and is dominated by slow moving monolithic players. The banks have a terrible reputation for customer service and can be challenged by disruptive startups that offer a better experience. Startups such as TransferWise, Iwoca, and Nutmeg are already having an impact and there are many more to follow.

In summary, we all know that startups generally thrive in clusters. These clusters need access to resources such as human talent, capital and physical infra-structure. The City of London is ideally placed to provide all of these to a vibrant tech scene that has grown-up right on the doorstep of the financial sector. This should be encouraged and can only lead to continued success.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every last Monday of the month.

 

iwatchLondon and New York are two cities that are well placed to take a lead in the fashion technology space. Both have a vibrant fashion scene, sitting alongside some rapidly developing tech startups. They can draw upon amazing talent from both sectors.

Fashion technology is a very broad sphere ranging from e-commerce and blogging through to wearable tech, sizing and image recognition. The fashion industry is well established and extremely creative. However, there is still a great deal of scope for technology to play a part.  We have identified a few challenges that still need addressing;

User experience issues – Fashion users are particularly sensitive to both style and function. Products have to look good and work well, or they will not gain customer acceptance.  We saw this with Google Glass, where the appearance of the product has been a factor in it’s slow acceptance. No one wants to be seen as a Glasshole. There are also a whole range of privacy issues relating to such a product. The iWatch is also going to face User Experience issues. The limited display face will dictate that it has to be used in conjunction with your smartphone and the limited battery power will be a real deterrent to mass adoption. Will there be a battle between smart watches and other less complex wrist-based devices?

The mobile experience - E-commerce is still difficult using a smartphone. Many online fashion retailers use the affiliate model to avoid keeping stock and dealing with returns. This involves a complex purchasing process, where the consumer is taken through to e-boutiques to make the ultimate purchase. Without aggregated baskets this can be an extremely frustrating experience. Solution providers such as TwoTap and UB are on the case, and trying to address this issue, but there is still some way to go before mobile fashion becomes a simple experience.

The tech is still lacking - There is still work to be done to make certain technologies fit for fashion consumers. A lot has been made of image recognition, with apps such as ASAP54 and others. Wouldn’t it be nice to snap that dress with your smartphone camera and buy the exact item with a few clicks. However, current image recognition is not up to the job and therefore can only suggest ‘find similar’. Many such apps  do not know whether you have snapped a pullover or a pair of shoes. Similar issues relate to sizing and styling apps. The technology is getting better but it is debatable whether it adds enough value for universal acceptance.

Many fashion apps are developed by tech oriented teams that do not understand the fashion industry. These startup teams should make sure that they include at least one fashion insider. Fashion is an enticing business. The sector is the fourth largest global market. However, it is extremely demanding. Many web-sites fall down, purely on graphic design and usability. Purchasing fashion is an emotive decision. Brand is important.  Net-a-porter, Farfetch and Asos are showing that keeping it simple is the key to success. It will be fascinating to see how the new crop of wearables manage to balance human needs with the increasing power of technology.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every last Monday of the month.

We are spending a lot of time with investors and building a big database of tech angels with a view to getting some of the startups on the Dreamstake platform funded. I have blogged a lot about the funding gap below VC level which I believe can only be filled by angel investment. Angels are private individuals who have access to enough wealth to put into startups and are willing to do so. Tech angels are a particularly rare breed. They may have sold a tech business or may simply be excited by the sector and willing to take a small gamble. However, there are a lot of myths about tech angels and it is important to understand the real situation or it can be extremely hard to secure funding by this route.

They know what they like – Tech angels are usually bright people who have achieved a high degree of success in their lives. They understand business and often know what they want to invest in. More specifically they know what they don’t want to invest in. It cannot be assumed that they will invest in the sector in which they made their money. They often know it too well and would prefer to look at new sectors. Angel investors will tend to look at broad areas such as B2B, consumer or fashion. It’s important to listen to what interests them and not sell too hard. If they say they are not interested they probably mean it. Prepare well for the meeting by researching past investments.

They want to spread their risk – Angel investors are simply people with a lot of money to invest. However, it is important to understand that they will only invest a very small percentage of their wealth into tech startups. It is a risky investment for them and will normally only represent 10%-20% of their overall portfolio. They will spread this portion of their investments over as many as 20 startups over the period in which they invest. Do the sums and be realistic about how much to ask for from each angel.

They invest in packs – Although you may occasionally come across lone wolves, angels generally invest in packs. This is because they want to spread their risk as much as possible and investing in groups means they can make a lot more smaller investments. A startup may be looking for £200K. Given that the average investment may typically be approximately £25K, the total round would involve 8-10 angels working together. Don’t expect to find too many angels investing upwards of £100K on a single startup.

They respect each others opinions – Tech angels may want to take the lead or follow an angel that they respect. The lead angel will often be a ‘smart’ investor who either understands the sector or simply has a track record of investing in tech. This is a useful dynamic to understand. Find a respected lead angel and they will recommend your startup to their friends.

They are not just in it for the money – Tech investors are rarely investing just for a return on their investment. They get a buzz from keeping their hand in and helping the entrepreneur to make a success of the venture. They can bring a huge amount of experience and contacts. They are usually looking for founders who are open-minded to advice. They will only work with people that they can get on with. Listen to what your angel is saying and avoid being defensive at all times.

They are not easy to spot - People with money to invest, do not shout about it. On the other hand there are plenty of people with no money who find it useful to pretend to be investors. They will end up selling you consulting or service. Real angels are spread over multiple networks or simply stay hidden. Dreamstake is building a strong network of angels from across all networks.

In summary, it is important to understand that founders will not normally find individual angels to fund anything other than very early stage businesses. It’s a bit of a numbers game. You may have to find as many as 20 angels to invest in a single funding round. These angels may belong to several networks or may work alone. It is useful to get a commitment from one or two smart investors and get their help in introducing others. Be realistic about the individual investment size and build the total commitment in small chunks. If necessary take part of the total round and continue fundraising until the total is reached.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  the world’s first tech startup platform to match founders with the most appropriate investors using a unique startup rating system. This allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when most needed. Startup founders can create profiles on the platform and get direct introductions to investors. We are constantly looking for great early stage tech startups. Investors please contact [email protected]

We have also recently launched an exclusive tech angel investment club in partnership with The Hoxton. HoxTech Angels will run invitation only angel investment evenings every last Monday of the month.

 

 

 

 

London has established itself as a great place to build a fashion technology startup. The fusion of a vibrant fashion sector with a growing tech scene makes the city an obvious place to launch. Funding fashion technology is a very different from investing in fashion designers.  It is more like funding a traditional tech business but with a few subtle differences.

Fashion tech is very diverse - The sector spans both software and hardware; from e-commerce, image recognition, artificial intelligence and big data through to wearables such as Google Glass or Fitbit.  Some of this hardware based technology is more capital intensive which may deter certain investors.

Fashion tech is sexy - This means that everyone wants a slice of the action. The scene is highly competitive and there are many look-alike products. Fashion tech startups need to be very good at marketing to get noticed and should enlist celebrities to get noticed. Investors should invest in startup teams that really understand the industry

Fashion e-commerce is big - Fashion is the fourth largest global market. Everyone wears clothes. Even relatively simple e-commerce businesses like Net-a-Porter and Asos have been very successful. Companies such as Lyst have secured significant investment and are expanding rapidly.

There are still problems to solve - This is an opportunity. However,  the problems are not trivial. On-line sizing remains a challenge and ordering through affiliate networks on mobile is very cumbersome and not easy to solve. Twotap and UB are both interesting startups working on this.

There are still plenty of business models to explore -  Startups such as Farfetch and Rentez-vous are stretching the e-commerce boundaries and exploring new models. However, it is a dynamic sector and there will be many other new models such as tinder for fashion from Grabble.

Design is important - This is a sector where style is crucial.  The early fashion tech startups were launched by geek teams and failed to gain traction.  Graphic design, UX, photography and video all have be to professional quality or the brands and consumers will not engage.

Smart money is very useful in this sector.  The fashion industry is closely knit and insiders can open doors very quickly. Most of the major tech VC’s have experience with at least one fashion tech startup.  Founders should ensure that their startups are investment ready before seeking funding. This means, making sure the product looks good and solves real problems in a user friendly way. Make sure the team is strong and includes at least one member with fashion experience.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  an online tech startup platform that matches founders with the most appropriate investors. The unique startup rating system allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when it will make the most impact.

 

There is little doubt that there is a greater availability of seed capital than ever before.  Although it is tempting to access low level funding through crowd-funding and accelerator programs, does it really make sense? If you are building a high potential tech startup it is important to aim for the best funding solution possible because it will have a real impact on future success. VC’s and other smart investors have responded to greater competition for quality deal-flow and will now get involved at an earlier stage than previously so as not to miss out. Don’t assume that crowd-funding and accelerators are the only options.

Here are a few ideas to think about;

- Rather than take a half baked idea onto a crowd-funding platform in the hope of attracting naive investors, obsess on nailing the proposition and make it attractive to smart investors. No-one knows the impact that equity-based crowd-funding will have on later funding rounds but my guess is that the best startups won’t take this route.

- Think carefully before going onto an accelerator program. Can it really accelerate your launch or does it just add 14 weeks? Many accelerators take too much equity in return for a very small amount of funding. Be aware that you may come out of the accelerator with less equity and no follow-on funding.

- Be cautious of paying up front for contacts. Pay-to-pitch is a rip-off and the big tech conferences are simply expensive pay-to-pitch events.

- Don’t assume that corporate money is always a good thing. The large firms sitting behind various programs are not looking to help you disrupt their business models. Although it can be good to get early revenues from corporate clients, be sure that they don’t come with too many strings attached.

There are no shortcuts. Availability of quality funding relates directly to the quality of the team, viability of the proposition and  eability to execute. Spend time getting these things right and bring on-board some smart advisers. Target lead investors who will add-value to your startup from the start.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  an online tech startup platform that matches founders with the most appropriate investors. The unique startup rating system allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support when it will make the most impact.

It’s already September and the investor community is back in town after their summer holidays. There is little doubt that the smartest investors will be on the search for the best startups.  They will be evaluating risks in many different ways but the excellent framework provided in ’11 Risks VC’s Evaluate’ by Tomasz Tunguz gives a good clue to the way they think. Take your startup back to school and try to minimise some of these risks;

Market timing risk – Do your research thoroughly to check that there is an appetite for what you are going to offer. Being too early is as bad as being too late.

Business model risk – Test one business model at a time. Multiple revenue streams are hard to measure. Fail fast and pivot if necessary.

Market adoption risk – Check out the likely competition and be sure that it’s not too easy for a Google or Facebook to steal your market.

Execution risk – Look closely at your team. Make sure that it covers all the bases and will inspire confidence in your investors. Be brutal. Without a good team you will not get investment.

Technology risk – Don’t try to re-invent the wheel. Use standard components when available. However, IP is sometimes important to minimise the chances of copying. Just be sure that what you are offering is possible.

Capitalisation structure risk -  There needs to be enough equity to share amongst investors and employees to keep them all motivated. Watch out not to give too much away early stage to crowd-funding or accelerators.

Platform risk – Make sure that you are working with the major platforms and not in competition with them.

Venture management risk-  This is all about how receptive you are to advice and how open you are about the state of play. Investors are looking for founders who listen and are positive to feedback.

Financial risk – Early stage investors don’t expect hugely detailed spreadsheets but they do want to be sure that you have given thought to the funding you need to meet each milestone. They will be turned off if you under-estimate your requirements.

Legal risk – Involve a lawyer early stage to ensure that there are not any unresolved issues. Investors hate surprises and will be looking for likely patent infringements and employee/co-founder issues. If they find these and you have not disclosed them it will lead to a severe breakdown in trust.

In summary, think like an investor and cover off all these risks. If you are not sure how we will go into more detail with the new term of Dreamstake Academy which starts on 15th September.

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  an online network, that provides end-to-end support for entrepreneurs wishing to get a tech startup funded in the shortest possible time. The startup rating system allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support at the appropriate time.

 

 

 

Over the last 10 years some great minds have turned their attention to the challenge of how to create tech startups in a repeatable way. Many of these have looked towards Silicon Valley for answers. Paul Graham and others in SV came up with the accelerator model which has now spread across the globe. The success of Y-combinator has lead to the proliferation of European accelerators based on the same model, but failing to deliver comparable results as in Silicon Valley.

I believe there are several issues with the current accelerator model:

- Do accelerators recruit enough quality startups into cohorts?

The cohort system seems to work against accelerators.  Recent programmes have struggled to find enough quality startups at the right stage in their development. Startups can only be accelerated effectively between the stages of problem/solution and product/market fit. Beyond this they have developed their ideas too far to help.

- Do accelerators really deliver results?

Most accelerator programmes focus on their ability to deliver quality mentoring. However, there simply are not enough experienced mentors out there. We cannot hope to emulate The Valley with its large number of internet millionaires from earlier IPO’s .  Instead our accelerator programmes fall back on bankers and other professionals who have never been involved in tech startups before. This does more harm than good.

- Why are they going niche?

Okay, to solve these problems why not go niche? Let’s all jump on the same bandwagon! Aren’t FinTech accelerators an oxymoron? They are heavily sponsored by banks and other financial institutions who can’t fail to negatively influence outcomes. Can an accelerator run by Barclays Bank really create startups capable of disrupting the banking industry?

- Whats the real value?

The reducing cost of tech has made it much easier for startups to get to product/market fit without involvement in a programme. There is also far greater access to early stage capital from other sources. Startups with strong propositions and good teams are sending out the wrong signals by signing up for second rate accelerators.  They are also throwing away equity for little or no return.

The availability of a early stage capital through accelerators, crowd-funding and the startup loans scheme is causing a problem further downstream. These initiatives are stimulating the formation of startups that can’t hope to attract later-stage investment.

- So what is the answer?

The startup market has changed. Quality startups need linking with smart investors very early on. Luckily internet platforms are able to do this.  Dreamstake in Europe and Angellist in the US are a good way to get investment from quality sources and ensure continuity. Startups benefit from a light touch. This means offering the appropriate level of funding and support exactly when it is required, on an ongoing basis.  Accelerators are unable to do this. Platforms such as Dreamstake can!

Blog by Paul Dowling – Co-Founder of Dreamstake  an online network, that provides end-to-end support for entrepreneurs wishing to get a tech startup funded in the shortest possible time. The startup rating system allows entrepreneurs and investors to monitor startup progress and inject capital and support at the appropriate time.